These and Those

Musings from Students of the Pardes Institute of Jewish Studies in Jerusalem

Tag Archives: processing sessions

The Practical Dictionary of the Pardes Lexicon: Second Edition

Posted on May 27, 2013 by Derek Kwait

At the end of last year, I gave the world “The Kwait“ the necessarily abridged First Edition of The Practical Dictionary of the Pardes Lexicon. Now, as my Pardes experience comes to a close, I present this still necessarily abridged Second Edition, to be known as “The Kwait Shayni.” This edition, like its predecessor, is Continue Reading »

A Jewish Day of Constructive Conflict

Posted on March 20, 2013 by Shoshana Rosen

On the 9th of Adar, the Pardes Center for Judaism and Conflict Resolution (PCJCR) sponsored its first annual Jewish Day of Constructive Conflict. According to the Shulchan Aruch, this was the day that the arguments of Bet Hillel and Bet Shammai deteriorated from a respectful difference of opinion into violence. Rabbi Daniel Roth prepared sources Continue Reading »

British Q&A

Posted on March 12, 2013 by Naomi Minsky

Here is my presentation from the Pardes Purim spiel: In the spirit of what we learnt about conflict resolution I am going to provide feedback on how I feel and relate to the Pardes community. I will begin by outlining my expectations prior to coming here. I came to Pardes excited to learn with students Continue Reading »

What is a prayer? [pt. 1 in a series]

Posted on December 19, 2012 by Avi Benson-Goldberg

(Part 1, Part 2, Part 3) Pardes was rocked by a shiur clalli (public class) about prayer in the Jewish world, particularly as experienced by three of our teachers: Rahel Berkovits, James Jacobson-Maisels, and Meir Schweiger. It was certainly an honor to see these teachers of ours open themselves up and expose the real humans inside! Continue Reading »

Week 37: The Practical Dictionary of the Pardes Lexicon

Posted on May 19, 2012 by Derek Kwait

(X-posted from my home blog, Yinzer in Yerushalayim) One of the unadvertised perks of Pardes is that after studying holy texts in their original in the Beit Midrash for a whole year, no matter how advanced your Hebrew level, you come away with a black-belt in using dictionaries. Yet I have noticed that for all Continue Reading »