These and Those

Musings from Students of the Pardes Institute of Jewish Studies in Jerusalem

Tag Archives: egalitarianism

[Alumni Post] It’s a Girl Thing

Posted on October 1, 2014 by Susan Fendrick

Pardes alumni, Susan P. Fendrick reminisces on her days at Pardes as she witnesses the next generation of women learning Talmud in this post originally published in the Jewish Advocate. Last week was a milestone in my daughter’s life—the kind of “first” that Jewish mothers of girls delightedly anticipate their daughters reaching, waiting to welcome Continue Reading »

A Letter to Men (Women are Invited to Read Too!)

Posted on October 1, 2014 by Geo Poor

Dear Men, Staring through the eyes of 50% of the Y-chromosome-holders in the Egalitarian Minyan, I wonder a question that I have never before thought but have heard from the other gender: “Where are all the guys?” Why is it that while the Mechizta Minyan has some 12 men and 2 women, the Egalitarian Minyan Continue Reading »

Challenges of Egalitarian Religious Practice on Israeli Army Bases

Posted on June 2, 2014 by Aliza Sebert

I wanted to share an exciting project with you. As part of my semester studying Israel education (through Kesher Hadash, the Israel semester of the JTS education school), I made a documentary dealing with the challenges of egalitarian religious practice on Israeli army bases. It is based in my experiences staffing Gadna last year while Continue Reading »

On the Other Side of the… Wait, There’s no Mechitza!

Posted on May 28, 2014 by Naomi Bilmes

From my blog: One of my close friends recently told me that I will forever be in her heart as her “mechitza-going-skirt-wearing-early-morning partner in crime Judaism.” This epigraph described our year at Pardes perfectly: we were two of the three women who regularly attended mechitza minyan; we wore skirts on a daily basis (and even Continue Reading »

The Strangest Kiddushin of them all

Posted on January 19, 2014 by Ben Schneider

From my blog: I’ve been learning a lot about traditional Jewish marriage this semester. In Gemara classes on tractates Kiddushin and Ketubot, we’ve been talking about how a man betroths a woman and what the language of the Ketubah indicates about their rights and obligations. There are also more esoteric topics: A man can encourage Continue Reading »

[Alumni Guest Post] Toward God’s Love

Posted on May 22, 2013 by Rabbi Julie Gordon

R. Julie Gordon (PEP ’12) recollects: Here are some of my thoughts after my experience davenning with Women of the Wall (WOW) on May 10, 2013. I was exhilarated on the day after my bat mitzvah when I learned how to lay tefillin through the wisdom and care of Bert Cooper, z”l, our Albert Lea, Continue Reading »

[Alumni Guest Post] Developing Myself

Posted on May 21, 2013 by Emma Sevitz

Robyn (Year ’08, PEP ’10) is a third-year teacher. She teaches High School Judaics at the Emory/Wiener School in Houston, where she will continue in the fall. My name is Robyn Miller. Typically, May is not a good time to ask me about my life as a teacher. I’m about to finish my third year Continue Reading »

Rosh Chodesh Sivan at the Kotel

Posted on May 12, 2013 by Andrea Wiese

From my blog: Friday morning was a blur. A scary blur. I didn’t wake up until 6:24 AM when my roommate screamed, “WIESE.” And I jumped out of bed, how could this happen, on a day that was so important to me? Never mind…we jumped in a taxi and I ran down to the women’s Continue Reading »

Swirl Swirl Desert Stop

Posted on January 19, 2013 by Naomi Bilmes

From my blog: (written two days ago) So, last night, I sat around a crackling fire with a group of religious people chanting incantations in ancient languages while passing around a hand-carved knife and letting the blood from our left pinkie fingers drip over the hot, scalding flames… Okay, that was an exaggeration. But I Continue Reading »

a new struggle i didn’t see coming

Posted on January 12, 2013 by Andrea Wiese

From my blog: “An individual who breaks a law that conscience tells him is unjust, and who willingly accepts the penalty of imprisonment in order to arouse the conscience of the community over its injustice, is in reality expressing the highest respect for the law.” ― Martin Luther King Jr. I know this sounds naive, Continue Reading »

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