These and Those

Musings from Students of the Pardes Institute of Jewish Studies in Jerusalem

Tag Archives: heritage / legacy

Some Initial Thoughts on Halakha

Posted on January 16, 2013 by David Bogomolny

One Aspect of Halakha that is Particularly Meaningful to Me “Anyone who identifies as Jewish today only need go back three or four generations to find observant Jews in their family. And from there an unbroken chain of Jewish living that goes back more than three thousand years. Not that everyone has always been observant. Continue Reading »

a new struggle i didn’t see coming

Posted on January 12, 2013 by Andrea Wiese

From my blog: “An individual who breaks a law that conscience tells him is unjust, and who willingly accepts the penalty of imprisonment in order to arouse the conscience of the community over its injustice, is in reality expressing the highest respect for the law.” ― Martin Luther King Jr. I know this sounds naive, Continue Reading »

[Alumni Guest Post] Shira Abramowitz – The Burden of Legacy: It is no dream.

Posted on January 4, 2013 by The Director of Digital Media

Shira has left us for another adventure, and we miss her… But her insightful writing continues (x-posted here below)! Legacy. A pretty big word around here. Here being Jerusalem, a city that many nations hold dear due to its history and importance in relation to their people, their culture, their religion. As a proud member of Continue Reading »

[Alumni Guest Post] Intrafaith Engagement

Posted on October 17, 2012 by The Director of Digital Media

by Ben Barer (Fall 2010, Fellows 2011-12) Cross-posted from his blog. “All Jews are friends” I came across this article recently, and the tenor of the article greatly disturbed me.  My friend and fellow Pardes alum did a wonderful job setting the record straight, but I see the underlying problem as requiring more thought as Continue Reading »

Post-Modernity’s Footnote to Modernity

Posted on May 22, 2012 by Barer

I just had the immense privilege of watching Footnote (הערת שוליים) with some fellow Pardesniks followed by a discussion with faculty who have intimate personal knowledge of the culture being described in the film.  First, I highly recommend watching the trailer and, if you are even remotely interested, watching the movie before reading what I Continue Reading »

2012 Poland Trip: A Journal Entry from April 18, 2012 (Erev Yom YaShoah)

Posted on April 23, 2012 by Laura H.

Being in Israel has taught me how to prepare. No, not how to properly pack bags, or take provisions for a hike – both of which are useful skills in this country, but how to prepare mentally. I noticed this immediately when I arrived. Pardes began as the month of Elul started, a time when Continue Reading »

Poland I

Posted on March 27, 2012 by Lauren Schuchart

On January 15th, I went to Poland with a group of students and faculty from my school. The trip was a “heritage seminar,” an opportunity to explore and appreciate the Jewish vibrancy that existed in Poland prior to World War II, much of which has left an enduring mark on the history of the Jewish people. Continue Reading »

וישב

Posted on December 16, 2011 by Barer

This week’s parsha is full of the narrative action we have become familiar with in Bereishit, with this parsha in particular being so great as to be turned into a Broadway musical (Joseph and the Amazing Coat of Many Colours).  However, a less-known fact is that the Rashbam chooses the beginning of this parsha to Continue Reading »

Russel vs. Chamberlain

Posted on November 5, 2011 by Soffer

Originally Posted for Shabbat Lech Lecha: Wilt Chamberlain? There is not doubt that he was great. But, Bill Russel? He’s the best that ever was. In sports, greatness cannot be measured in simple statistics–if that were possible, Chamberlain would easily be the greatest player in NBA history. But, as any sports fan knows, there is Continue Reading »

Shrine of the Book – Postcard Commentary #1

Posted on June 13, 2011 by Daniel Weinreb

The week I arrived here, I knew I would have to make a pilgrimage to the Shrine of the Book (Heykhal HaSefer). To me, it is more moving than is the Kotel, and more inspiring. After all, what other nation has a shrine to a book in the heart of its capitol? Of course, libraries Continue Reading »